Electron-vibration phenomena in molecules and solids: Symmetry breaking and beyond

The XXIVth International Symposium on the Jahn-Teller Effect

24th-29th June 2018 - Santander (Spain)

Welcome to Santander!

Important dates:

  • 8/1/18 - Registration is open
  • 30/4/18 - Abstract submission deadline

Recent News:

  • 1/6/17 - If you are 35 or less and you have some great research story involving the interaction of electron and vibrations...
    Apply for an invitation to our hot topic session!
  • 1/6/17 - Check out our preliminary speaker line-up!
  • 1/6/17 - The conference webpage is online!

General information

The symposium addresses experimental observation, theoretical modeling, and computer simulation of physical and chemical phenomena associated with strongly correlated electronic and nuclear motions. The strong vibronic coupling of the Jahn-Teller and pseudo Jahn-Teller effects influences a variety of molecular and solid state properties including spectroscopy, photochemistry, ferroelectricity and multiferroicity, charge and energy transport, superconductivity, molecular magnetism and a number of other fields. The conference is designed as a multidisciplinary meeting of physicists, chemists, and material scientists with experimental, computational, or theoretical backgrounds in this field. Organized by topics and given by key researchers, invited talks will provide a panoramic view of the current and most important problems in this field.

Begun in 1976, these symposia have historically focused on the coupling between electronic and nuclear motions in molecules and solids under conditions of electronic degeneracy and pseudodegeneracy, when the Jahn-Teller and Pseudo Jahn-Teller effects are operative. More recently, the scope has expanded into a broader range of strong vibronic and electron-phonon couplings that influence a vast range of physical and chemical phenomena. This symposium intends to further enrich this field by involving novel modeling concepts, and to benefit from insight gained by its interdisciplinary nature.

Topics of the Symposium